Leadership Links

Observations about leadership and management

mintchocolatecandle:

fillionite:

It’s a spickey!

 I thought I was going to have a horrible day today, what with my imminent failure of an anatomy test, but then I saw this. Now nothing can go wrong with my day. :D

(via prodigiousdxctor)

We need to encourage our women to be leaders, yet we too often knock them down with labels like “bossy” and “pushy” whenever they do take the lead.  

Learn what you can do as a manager to support and grow your female leaders with tips provided by Lean In & The Girls Scouts at BanBossy.com: http://banbossy.com/manager-tips/ 

The downloadable pdf includes:
- 10 tips to help managers combat gender bias at work
- Must-know facts and figures on women and work
- Group exercises to identify and overcome gender bias at the office
- Plus tips on what women can do for themselves

We need to encourage our women to be leaders, yet we too often knock them down with labels like “bossy” and “pushy” whenever they do take the lead.

Learn what you can do as a manager to support and grow your female leaders with tips provided by Lean In & The Girls Scouts at BanBossy.com: http://banbossy.com/manager-tips/

The downloadable pdf includes:
- 10 tips to help managers combat gender bias at work
- Must-know facts and figures on women and work
- Group exercises to identify and overcome gender bias at the office
- Plus tips on what women can do for themselves

One of the most persistent beliefs leaders tell themselves and employees is that if you can’t measure something, it does not matter. I can easily refute that belief with two questions:

1. Do you love your partner/spouse, mother, father, or children?
2. If yes (no one has answered no yet), then tell me precisely how much. And when you answer, please pick an amount and a unit of measure. So your answer would be something like, “I love my children 12 gallons,” or “I love my husband six kilometers.”

Naturally, that’s absurd. The love you feel matters a great deal and yet seems impossible to measure. Employee motivation is a bit like that. It matters a great deal to the well-being of your employees and the financial success of the company. And yet it seems impossible to measure. But that’s the thing—it is remarkably easy to measure. Here’s how.

managingamericans:

A New Leadership Key Performance Indicator
A Billion Words of Leadership – Is it time for a Leadership Checkup?

A leader’s actions communicate far more than the words they speak, and rest assured, the organization is paying attention. In fact, the organization will follow what the leader does even more so than what they say; this is where many organizational problems begin. This article reveals a NEW Leadership KPI focused on walking the talk to make your organization effective. It’s worth a read, please check it out. http://ow.ly/mBOGU

managingamericans:

A New Leadership Key Performance Indicator

A Billion Words of Leadership – Is it time for a Leadership Checkup?

A leader’s actions communicate far more than the words they speak, and rest assured, the organization is paying attention. In fact, the organization will follow what the leader does even more so than what they say; this is where many organizational problems begin. This article reveals a NEW Leadership KPI focused on walking the talk to make your organization effective. It’s worth a read, please check it out. http://ow.ly/mBOGU

(Source: ManagingAmericans.com)

Four Words a Boss Never Wants to Hear

There are four words a boss never wants to hear: “I don’t trust you.” However, you will rarely, if ever, hear someone say that to you directly.

So how can you tell if there’s a lack of trust in the workplace?

Why Perfectionists are Often the Biggest Failures

A few years ago on a college campus, a ceramics professor decided to try an experiment on one of his classes. At the start of the semester he divided the class into two groups and explained that each group would be graded differently.

Group 1 would be graded on the total number of pots they could create throughout the semester, with a minor importance given to quality.

Group 2 would be graded on just one pot. They had all semester to work on just one pot so they better make it impressive.

At the end of the semester, the students all turned in their work for grading. To the professor’s amusement, the 5 highest quality pots all came from the group who was focused on quantity over quality. In fact, most of the pots from Group 2 were terrible. They just looked like over-worked lumps of hollowed out clay.

Why did this happen?